Teaching, Learning, & Leadership

B.S. in Childhood Education (Grades 1-6)

The 120-credit B.S. in Childhood Education (Grades 1-6) leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science and eligibility for initial NYS certification in childhood education, grades 1-6. It prepares students to teach in elementary school classrooms.

The major in Childhood Education consists of 40 credits in Teaching and Learning. Optional extensions are available for students interested in teaching in middle schools or in bilingual classrooms. In addition, all students must select a 27-credit concentration or a second major in a Liberal Arts and Sciences area. Fieldwork is required throughout the program.

The program is divided into a pre-professional stage and a professional stage. All students are welcome to take six credits of pre-professional courses. Students must meet specific criteria for progression into the professional stage, admission to student teaching and graduation.

Students graduating from the program are eligible for NYS certification once they have passed all required portions of the New York State Teacher Certification Exam (NYSTCE). The SOE Certification Officer assists students in applying for certification when all requirements are met.


Program Curriculum

Course # Course Name Credits
TAL 201 Teaching: Imagine the Possibilities  3
TAL 301 Observing and Describing Children 3
TAL 350 The Developing Child  4
TAL 351 Language and Literacy I  3
TAL 352 Sociology and Education 3
TAL 353 Creating Inclusive Classroom Communities   3
TAL 401 Language and Literacy II  3
TAL 402 Teaching and Learning Social Studies in Elementary Schools  3
TAL 403 Teaching and Learning Mathematics/Technology in Elementary Schools 3
TAL 404 Teaching and Learning Science/Technology in Elementary Schools  3
TAL 450 Student Teaching in Childhood Education   3
TAL 451 Student Teaching Seminar in Childhood Education  3
Optional Extension in Bilingual Education (9 credits) 
An optional Bilingual Extension is available for those who can demonstrate bilingual proficiency. Students seeking the Bilingual Education extension must also pass the Bilingual Education Assessment (BEA) of the NYSTCE in the target language.

Course # Course Name Credits
Required Core Courses
English Composition
ENG 16/ ENG 16C English Composition 3
English Literature
Select one (1) course from the following:
ENG 61 European Literatures I 3
ENG 62 European Literatures II 3
ENG 63 American Literatures 3
ENG 64 Global Literatures 3
History
Select one (1) course from the following:
HIS 1 Perspectives in Pre-modern World History 3
HIS 2 Perspectives in Modern World History 3
Philosophy
PHI 60 Philosophical Explorations 3
Speech
SPE 3 Oral Communication 3
Mathematics
Select one (1) course from the following, unless major requirements list specific Math courses:
MTH 15 Math Tools and Their Use 4
MTH 16 Finite Mathematics 3
Science Lab-Based Course
Select one (1) course from the following:
BIO Biology 4
CHM Chemistry 4
PHY Physics 4
Foreign Language
Select one (1) course from the following:
SPA 11 Introductory Spanish I 3
SPA 12 Introductory Spanish II 3
ITL 11 Introductory Italian I 3
ITL 12 Introductory Italian II 3
FRE 11 Introductory French I 3
FRE 12 Introductory French II 3
Visual and Performing Arts
Select one (1) course from the following:
ART 61 Introduction to Visual Art 3
DNC 61 Dance Through Time 3
JOU 61 Journalism, Social Media, and You 3
MA 61 Media Arts and Technology 3
MUS 61 Music and Culture 3
THE 61 The Theatrical Vision 3
Social Sciences I
Select any introductory course from the following:
Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology 3
Social Sciences II
Select any introductory course from the following:
Anthropology, Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology 3

Credit Requirements
Total Major Requirement Credits 37
Total Elective Liberal Arts & Sciences Credits 57
Total Core Requirement Credits 34-35
Total Degree Credits 120

Courses

TAL 201 Teaching: Imagine the Possibilities

An introduction for the pre-professional student to the possibilities and processes of professional life in diverse inclusive urban schools through initial exploration of school contexts, learning processes, roles of teachers, and the self as a prospective teacher. Guided school visits, reflective writings, and seminal readings enable students to examine the field of education from historical, sociological and philosophical perspectives. Selected Teaching and Learning faculty discuss such current trends as multiculturalism and the inclusion of students with disabilities. For all students considering teaching as a career choice. Fifteen hours of structured fieldwork required.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring

TAL 301 Observing and Describing Children

An introduction to a holistic method of observing and reflecting on children. Throughout the semester, students observe a child in home, school and community settings; this descriptive review process has as its philosophical foundation the premise that children construct knowledge and make meaning of their world. Students learn a descriptive vocabulary and the skills necessary to write a full and balanced portrayal of a learner that becomes fundamental to their teaching practice. Thirty hours of structured fieldwork are required. The pre-requisite of TAL 201 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring

TAL 350 The Developing Child

An introductory examination of the process of change from birth through pre-adolescence in children from diverse backgrounds with a range of abilities. Theories of development and learning and ways in which they inform educational practices will be studied.  Throughout the course, attention will be given to ways in which culture, race, class, ethnicity, gender; sexual orientation, language, and disability play a role in development and in the teaching and learning process. The course will also explore the lives of children who have disabilities from historical, legislative, educational, and autobiographical perspectives. The classification process in schools including how students are identified to have disabilities will be addressed. Students will have fieldwork experiences with children and will engage in different types of course assignments to develop discipline-specific writing skills. Writing-intensive course for the major. Fifteen hours of structured fieldwork required.

The pre-requisite of TAL 301 or 302 is required and a minimum GPA of 2.50.

Credits: 4

Annually

TAL 351 Language and Literacy I

A focus on emergent literacy, emphasizing the teaching of reading from a developmental socio-psycholinguistic perspective and highlighting the relationship between language and literacy. Different theories of teaching reading and writing are discussed. Students become familiar with appropriate literature for young children as well as the concept of multiple literacies. Special attention is given to developing strategies to meet individual learning needs within a collaborative and inclusive model, including the needs of children with disabilities, bilingual students and English-language learners. The role of assessment in planning instruction is also addressed. An integrated fieldwork experience includes the home, community and classroom teaching environments. Fifteen hours of structured fieldwork required.

The pre-requisite of TAL 301 or TAL 302 is

required and a minimum GPA of 2.50 is required. Credits: 3

Annually

TAL 352 Sociology and Education

A field-based course in which students use the results of sociological research to inform their observation and analysis of schools and society. Emphasis is placed on such variables as parental involvement and home environment, race/ethnicity, and social class as well as school- related variables, including grouping and teaching practices, teacher attributes and expectations, class and school size, and curriculum. Students make an observational study in a classroom setting that addresses a problem of significance. Ten hours of structured fieldwork are required.

The pre-requisite of TAL 301 or 302 is required and a minimum GPA of 2.50.

Credits: 3

Annually

TAL 353 Creating Inclusive Classroom Communities

A course in which students explore ways to create peaceful democratic classrooms where all children are respected and valued. Emphasis will be on viewing behavior and classroom management contextually, with the aim of fostering social and emotional learning.   Students will learn and practice methods of facilitating positive classroom climate, such as peer mediation, conflict resolution, and positive behavioral supports which promote interpersonal communication and social participation. 15 fieldwork hours required.

The pre-requisite of TAL 350 is required.

Credits: 3

Annually

TAL 401 Language and Literacy II

A focus on the developing and fluent reader and the place of reading within the integrated curriculum. Linguistic and cognitive processes underlying comprehension are explored within a balanced literacy program of reading and writing instruction. Students become familiar with a variety of literature for children. Special attention is given to developing strategies to meet individual learning needs within a collaborative and inclusive model, including issues of bilingualism and biliteracy. The role of assessment in planning instruction is also addressed, along with approaches to remediation of literacy difficulties. An integrated fieldwork experience focuses on small- group and classroom instruction. Fifteen hours of structured fieldwork required.

The pre-requisites of TAL 350 and 351 or TAL

TAL 402 Teaching and Learning Social Studies in Elementary Schools

An introduction to a theme-based, inquiry-directed, literature-rich, multicultural approach to teaching and learning social studies. New York State social studies standards are reviewed, with a focus on learning goals, essential questions, portfolio assessment, and preparation for democratic citizenship. Emphasis is placed on building broadly inclusive classroom communities. Strategies to meet individual learning needs within an inclusive model are discussed. The fieldwork component integrates course work and classroom practice. Fifteen hours of structured fieldwork required.

The pre-requisites of TAL 350, TAL 351 and ALCX 702 - 705 are required and a minimum GPA of

2.50 is required.

Credits: 3

Annually

TAL 403 Teaching and Learning Mathematics/Technology in Elementary Schools

An inquiry-based approach to learning mathematics and technology as a tool for teaching. Emphasis is placed on raising questions, planning and developing solutions for open-ended mathematical problems, and formative assessment of learning. While reviewing basic mathematical concepts such as variables, functions and measurements, students practice the inquiry approach in fieldwork experience. Particular attention is paid to developing strategies to meet individual learning needs within a collaborative and inclusive model while addressing NYS/Common Core Learning Standards. Approaches to addressing difficulties in math will be explored. Fifteen hours of structured fieldwork required.

The pre-requisites of TAL 350, TAL 351 and ALCX 702 - 705 are required and a minimum GPA of

2.50 is required.

Credits: 3

Annually

TAL 404 Teaching and Learning Science/Technology in Elementary Schools

An inquiry-based approach to teaching science and technology. Emphasis is placed on raising questions, planning and developing solutions for open-ended mathematical problems, and formative assessment of learning. While reviewing basic science concepts and skills, students practice the inquiry approach in fieldwork experience. Particular attention is paid to developing strategies to meet individual learning needs within an inclusive model while addressing NYS/Common Core Learning Standards. Fifteen hours of structured fieldwork required.

The pre-requisites of TAL 350, TAL 351 and ALCX 702 - 705 are required and a minimum GPA of

2.50 is required

Credits: 3

Annually

TAL 450 Student Teaching in Childhood Education

A student teaching semester that prepares reflective teachers to create effective classrooms and schools for all urban students. Students participate in every aspect of practice, including planning, implementation and assessment of curriculum and instruction. They immerse themselves in the life of a school, recording and thinking about the purposes, complexities and consequences of what they do as teachers in order to learn from their experiences. Students are supervised by a University faculty member and a cooperating teacher in the participating school. Schools and classrooms are chosen with special attention to diversity. Student teaching is full time, five days a week for 15 weeks. Students have one main placement in grades 1 through 3 or grades 4 through 6 throughout the semester. In addition, they are required to student teach for a minimum of 20 full days at the other level (either 1-3 or 4-6).

The co-requisite of TAL 451 is required and

permission of the Department.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring

TAL 451 Student Teaching Seminar in Childhood Education

A seminar that gives student teachers an opportunity to look closely and critically at their work in classrooms. Through reflective conversations, readings and writing assignments about their teaching practice, students learn how to create meaningful relationships with children and the classroom community through engaging curriculum. They explore how issues of diversity, including class, disability, ethnicity, gender, language, race and sexual orientation; affect the lives of children and their own lives as teachers. Major strands underlying the childhood education program are revisited and integrated with new material that will deepen students understanding of how to meet the educational needs of all students. The co-requisite of TAL 450 is required.

Credits: 3

Every Fall and Spring

CONTACT

School of Education
Dr. Laura Seinfeld, Dean
Laura.Seinfeld@liu.edu