Fashion Merchandising

SCHOOL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

Cherie Serota
Director of Fashion Merchandising
516-299-4126

B.S. in Fashion Merchandising

The Fashion Merchandising curriculum allows students to combine a myriad of academic majors, such as marketing, public relations, management, economics, and journalism, with a Fashion Merchandising minor, giving them dual knowledge and skills that will enhance status with future employers. Proximity to fashion centers has afforded LIU’s fashion students opportunities for jobs and internships in the industry and to interact with masters of the retailing and design universe, including the head of menswear for Ralph Lauren, executives from Macy’s, and President of the Americana Manhasset Deidre Costa Major.

The faculty is led by Cherie Serota, co-founder of an international apparel company whose experience includes work in the buying, fashion, and marketing offices at Saks Fifth Avenue and Henri Bendel.


Major Requirements

Course # Course Name Credits
Required Fashion Merchandising Courses
(48 Credits)
FM 10 Introduction to the Fashion Industry 3
FM 12 The Business of Fashion Merchandising 3
FM 14
Math for Merchandising 3
FM 20 Buying for the Fashion Industry 3
FM 24 Fashion Trend Forecasting
FM 25 Brand Management
3
FM 26 Importing and Exporting
FM 32 Fashion Media  3
FM 39 Fashion Sustainability 3
FM 40 Fundamentals of Textiles
FM 50 Visual Merchandising and Display
FM 60 Fashion Law
FM 92 Capstone 3
MKT 11 Marketing Principles and Practices
     
Fashion Merchandising Elective Courses
(6 credits)
 Choose two from the Following Fashion Merchandising Elective Courses

FM 35

Computer Aided Design: CAD for Merchandising

3

FM 39 Sustainability in Global Fashion
FM 56 Luxury Branding
FM 72 Style Writing
FM 82 Global Fashion Consulting 3
FM 87  Fashion Merchandising Internship 3
FM 88 Fashion Merchandising Engaged & Global Learning 1
May take FM 88 up to three times for a maximum of 3 credits

MAN 18

Introduction to Business Information Processing

3

DA 118

Data Analytics Using Excel 3
DA 120 Introduction to Data Analytics
     
Liberal Arts and Science Electives
(27-28 Credits)
 
 Course # Course Name Credits
Required Core Courses 
(32-33 Credits)
POST 101 Post Foundations 1
FY First-Year Seminar 3
ENG 1 Writing 1 3
ENG 2 Writing 2 3
Choose one course from each of the five below course clusters and one additional course from one of the clusters.
Quantitative Reasoning
3
Scientific Inquiry & the Natural World
4
Creativity Media & the Arts 3
Perspectives on World Culture 3
Self, Society & Ethics 3
Power, Institutions & Structures (ECO 10 Required) 3
One additional course from one of the clusters above. 3-4
 Required General Electives
(12 credits from any course)
 

Credit Requirements
Total Major Requirement Credits 42
Elective Major Credits 6
General Elective Credits
12 
Total Core Requirement Credits 32-33
Elective Liberal Arts & Sciences Credits 27-28
Total Degree Credits 120

Courses


DA 118 Data Analytics Using Excel

The course provides students with the opportunity to learn data processing skills needed to execute business and professional functionalities using Microsoft Excel. It also prepares students to master more advanced, data analytics skills in Excel. Emphasis is placed on how to efficiently navigate big datasets and use the keyboard to access commands during data processing. The course provides students extensive hands-on experience in learning through practicing with datasets drawn from accounting, finance and other business scenarios. Students will also learn the basis for conceptualizing and designing data analytics projects with the highest level of integrity. Data visualization skills are also introduced and reinforced throughout the course. At the end of the course students are expected to pass the exam and earn the Microsoft Office Specialist certification in Excel.
Credits: 3
Every Semester


DA120 Introduction to Data Analytics with R and Python

This required core course in the Data Analytics program provides a comprehensive introduction to the principles of data science that underlie the data-mining algorithms, data-driving decision-making process, and data-analytic thinking. Topics include learning commands, arithmetic operators, logical operators, and functions in the analytical languages, writing scripts, performing descriptive analytics, creating analytical graphs, and working and manipulating data sets using the two most popular analytic languages of R and Python.
Credits: 3
Every Semester



ECO 10 Introduction to Microeconomics

This course discusses the important economic theories and concepts that facilitate understanding economic events and issues. Its main focus is on the choices made by consumers, producers, and governments, and there interactions of these choices. Topics include demand and supply, consumption, and production, competitive and non-competitive product markets, markets for resources, and welfare. This course fulfills the Power, Institutions, and Structures thematic cluster requirement in the core curriculum.
Credits: 3
On Occasion


ENG 1 Writing I: Composition and Analysis 

English 1 is an introductory writing course that uses interpretation and analysis of texts to promote clear thinking and effective prose. Students learn the conventions of academic writing. In addition, students learn how to adapt writing for various audiences and rhetorical situations. This course is required Writing I, an introduction to composition, teaches an understanding of writing in various disciplines through the interpretation and analysis of texts. Students will learn conventions of academic writing. Additionally, students will learn how to adapt in response to different rhetorical situations, genres, purposes, audiences, and other issues of context. Writing I is a course that provides the foundation for understanding how to make meaning from texts. This course is required of all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit or successful achievement on the SAT examination in writing. Students exempted by assessment or department proficiency examination must take an upper-level English course in substitution after completing ENG 2. Special sections are offered for students in the Program for Academic Success (P sections), for non-native speakers (F sections), and for students identified as needing more personalized attention (S sections). No Pass/Fail option
Credits: 3
Every Fall, Spring and Summer


 

ENG 2 Writing II: Research and Argumentation

Writing II, a course in research and argumentation, focuses on scholarly research and the citation of information supporting sustained, rhetorically effective arguments. Building on the work of Writing I, this course addresses sensitivity to complex rhetorical and stylistic choices. Students will learn to use sources and resources effectively and ethically, including library holdings and databases, in service of scholarly arguments grounded in research. This course is required for all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit. Special sections are offered for students in the Program for Academic Success (P sections) and for non-native speakers (F sections). No Pass/Fail option. Prerequisite of ENG 1 is required.
Credits: 3
Every Fall, Spring and Summer


FM 10 Introduction to the Fashion Industry

Introduction to the Fashion Industry This course explores the relationship of the fashion industry to society and consumer demand. It includes fashion history development, a survey of select fashion industries, fashion design, apparel manufacturing, textile marketing, fashion merchandising, and accessory marketing in a global marketplace.
Credits: 3
Every Fall


FM 12 Business of Fashion Merchandising

This course covers the business side of the fashion industry. It provides students with realistic information about the evolving landscape of the retailing and apparel merchandise industries. Whether working for a fashion brand or starting a business in fashion, this course explores how a line is created from the research and design stage to the marketing, sourcing, production and distribution stage. It provides insight on how the industry is organized, how apparel and accessory companies operate, and how they are affected by changing technology and globalization. To engage students with real world application, the course meets regularly in The Student Body Boutique. Further to this, the course will include periodic excursions to trade shows, visits to vendors and showrooms.
Credits: 3
Every Fall


FM 14 Math for Merchandising

This course develops the mathematical and EXCEL skills for individuals who will be directly or indirectly involved in the activities of merchandising and buying for a fashion company or at the retail level. This course explains the essential concepts, practices, procedures, formulas, calculations, and interpretations of figures that relate to producing profitable buying and selling operations. At the same time, this course uses real world examples often modeled using EXCEL that reflect current industry practices and trends, so students are prepared for merchandising careers.
Credits: 3
Every Fall 


FM 20 Buying for the Fashion Industry

This course provides students with the skills and savvy needed to become effective buyers in any area of retail. Typical buying tasks, such as identifying and understanding potential customers, creating a six-month merchandising plan, and developing sales forecasts, will be discussed in the context of current business automated software. Additional topics will include the coverage of important retailing trends and technological advances, including social responsibility, sustainability, fast fashion, and the use of new media and social networking. This course will meet periodically in The Student Body to engage course concepts in a retail environment and on occasion work with the buying team at an actual trade show.
Pre requisites: FM 10 and FM 14
Credits: 3
Every Spring


FM 24 Fashion Trend Forecasting

Fashion trend analysis and forecasting is vital to product and brand development. Through trend analysis and forecasting using current industry forecasting service software, students gain an understanding of how consumers and industry serve as product developers, gatekeepers and promoters of fashion. This course explores the roles of how fashion consumption impacts the environment and economic development. It looks at how socio-cultural changes, social responsibility and the digital consumer affect fashion trends. An ideal mix of creativity and professionalism are employed toward course deliverables including trend boards and associated presentations. A pre requisite of FM 10 and FM 12 is required. 
Credits: 3
Every Spring


FM 25 Brand Management

Students will develop core skills needed towards understanding, crafting, measuring, and managing brand strategies within fashion and other related industries. The course draws on marketing, sociological, and psychological theories of consumer behavior and examines branding as a co-creation of consumers, marketers, and culture. The course objectives are to: 1) design effective brand identities and value propositions as part of overall business strategy; 2) develop brand-building strategies 3) apply brand licensing and creative elements for effective branding; 4) leverage digital technologies, such as social media marketing, to promote branding and licensing programs. Coursework may incorporate a live business case and project designed to develop collaboration, critical thinking and creativity in brand management.
Prerequisite of MKT 11 is required.
Credits: 3
Every Fall 


FM 26 Importing and Exporting

A global industry for sourcing, the fashion industry must take advantage of low-cost producing countries and their respective manufacturing. However, international trade is a necessity in order to grow and generate profits. The U.S. export-import trade policies/ procedures, current trends and key trade relationships are covered in this course. Students will become skilled in what research, resources and analysis skills come into play in order to decide whether to export or import and then how global trade issues affect the textile and apparel industries.
A pre requisite of FM 10, FM 12, and FM 14 is required.
Credits: 3
Every Fall


FM 32 Fashion Media

This course will successfully cover how fashion media marketing communicates the value of a brand’s product or service to their target customer. Presently, with the emergence of new media: ecommerce, social media, digital content, interactive media, and mobile apps, the marketing process is moving at light speed. Companies and marketers with this enhanced customer information must be prepared to engage dynamically. In this class, students will explore all facets of new media through discussions, readings and exploration of pertinent websites, blogs and Instagram accounts. Special emphasis will be placed on current new media applications, activities and campaigns, using topical articles and case studies. Students will learn to identify and differentiate key media platforms and understand the pros and cons of each to effectively build targeted marketing strategies.
Credits: 3
Every Spring


FM 34 Special Events

Students will learn about a variety of special events and how to organize and manage them. Additionally, they will learn about special events history, rationale, goals and strategies, as well as the value of special events in a public relations strategy. The types of events to be discussed include fashion shows, tours of business facilities, conferences, openings, employee and customer recognition initiatives, product and services launches, community relations, sports promotions, fundraisers, galas, anniversary celebrations, and entertainment premieres. (Note that this course is cross-listed with PR 14) 
A pre requisite of FM 30 is required.
Credits: 3
On Occasion


FM 35 Computer Aided Design: CAD for Merchandising

This fundamental course introduces the basic two dimensional and three-dimensional graphic design software platform, known as Computer Aided Design (CAD). This tool can be used in various design and technical applications to enable designers to create and produce various design presentation products, such as visual display concepts, retail design, space planning, digital trend and concept boards, textile color developments, among other things. This course offers students the opportunity to upgrade their digital visual merchandising skills to industry standards and add an additional technical capability to their resumes.
Credits: 3
On Occasion


FM 39 Sustainability in Global Fashion

Sustainability has emerged as a central issue for contemporary societies and for the world community as a whole. Furthermore, many of the social and environmental concerns that are embodied in the term 'sustainability' are directly or indirectly related to design and the world of fast fashion. Sustainable fashion refers to fashion products that are manufactured, marketed and used in the most sustainable manner possible, taking into account both environmental and socioeconomic aspects. Designers help to define our human made environment- how it is produced, how it is used, and how long it endures. This course provides students an opportunity to acquire a foundational understanding of the scientific, political and social issues related to the design of resilient urban futures. The topic of sustainability in textile manufacture has been the subject of considerable research. In this course, we will also explore the textile industry from the perspective of social sustainability, shifting the focus from the materiality of textile production to the industry's relationships with the communities from which the products originate.
Credits: 3
Every Fall


FM 40 Fundamentals of Textiles

This course explores the science of textiles including information regarding fabric identification: fabric name, fiber content, yarn construction, count, coloration, finishes, weight, and list of characteristics. Students will learn the inherent performance properties and construction of fibers and yarns which are relevant for professionals in the fashion industry, such as product developers, stylists, buyers, designers, etc. This course brings together a wide variety of information enabling students to spend less time trying to connect the ideas and more time applying the concepts so they can make appropriate choices in textile selections for a product.
A pre requisite of FM 10 is required.
Credits: 3
Every Fall


FM 50 Visual Merchandising and Display

This course will uncover the many techniques used in the visual merchandising industry. A hands-on approach is utilized whereby students design and construct interior displays. By the use of ingenuity and creative thinking, apparel items are employed to produce selling displays. Institutional and abstract concepts will be discussed and practiced. The language of the retail industry will also be used to explain and familiarize each student to this discipline. Discussions on digital retailing, “Pop Up” shops and Brick and Mortar will be explored and may include possible on site retail visits. Weekly projects and presentations on window prep and store design will be integrated into the coursework.
A pre requisite of FM 10, and FM 12 is required.
Credits: 3
Every Spring


FM 56 Luxury Branding

Luxury has been both celebrated and condemned throughout history right up to the present day. In this course, we will examine luxury and its relationship with desire, status, consumption and economic value, exploring why luxury always triumphs in spite of the economy and world affairs. Brand strategy is the compass directing creative brand solutions. To this means, students will study the brand, its purpose and target audience, shop the market and analyze merchandising and marketing strategies to reveal insights and create meaningful brand ethos. We will take a look at case studies from the luxury sector such as like Chanel, LVMH and Tiffany, as well as luxury travel, retail store design, tech, beauty and accessories in exploring how the most successful luxury brands function and defining what luxury represents in the contemporary world. Explore old luxury and the democratization of modern affordable luxury with its criteria and strategy for today's consumer. The final project of the program results in a deliverable that responds to current trends in the luxury marketplace, culminating in a paper and professional presentation.
Credits: 3
On 
Occasion


FM 60 Fashion Law

From fashion start-ups to ongoing business, fashion professionals must be savvy regarding the legal decisions and regulatory developments that affect fashion companies. This course explores intellectual property protection, licensing, anti-counterfeiting and litigation. It also covers the legal aspects for start-ups, and commercial transactions in local, custom, and international settings. Just as importantly, students will learn about the legal challenges and caveats in fashion advertising, marketing and celebrity endorsements.   Pre requisites: FM 12; FM 25 or MKT 25.
Credits: 3
Every Spring


FM 70 Fashion Entrepreneurship

Starting a business is a daunting task whether individuals want to open their own stores, sell their own products or establish their own brands. This course focuses on the ready-to-wear process so students can identify market opportunities and execute a business plan in a competitive retail environment. It explores all areas of a "fashion start up" and examines how products are planned and developed. From the perspectives of consumers, manufacturers and retailers in a global context, students will look at the requirements and relationships needed to develop a plan, build a business, launch a brand and channel it to the ultimate consumer.
Credits: 3
On Occasion


FM 72 Fashion Style Writing

Clear, compelling and correct writing skills are essential for success in any field. A fashion writer is someone who writes journalism or copy relating to aspects of fashion and style. This course incorporates the construction of creative prose into the field of fashion with an emphasis on style. Features and copy for a variety of media including fashion magazines, advertising, trade publications, newspapers and increasingly online forums such as blogs and social media will be addressed. Ideas for source material will be identified in this course the same way as in the industry by attending fashion shows and collaborating with professionals to identify trends in the marketplace. Pitching articles, conducting interviews, and writing fashion features are some of the learning activities incorporated in this course. A pre requisite of FM 10 and FM 12 is required.
Credits: 3
Every Fall


FM 82 Global Fashion
This course will explore how retailers and manufacturers are responding to the challenges of a rapidly expanding and evolving marketplace. Drawing on lessons learned from manufacturing, retailing, and global commerce, we will address the rise of the global consumer, the in-store shopping experience, and managing the retail experience across multiple channels. We will also explore the economic, geopolitical, and cultural factors governing the basic tenets of today's globalized marketplace. Various international regions are analyzed in terms of their market characteristics and current retail environment. U.S. retailers operating globally are also discussed and analyzed in detail. Topics will include fair trade, free trade and the expansion of the globalized marketing system through multi-channel retailing. The course will have an optional travel component with a subsidized week long trip in which students will experience the culture, working environment, and commerce of a major fashion capitol in the world.
Credits: 3
Every Spring


FM 87 Fashion Merchandising Internship
This internship opportunity permits students to supplement classroom instruction with real-world experience. After preparation of a resume for review by the faculty mentor, the student selects an appropriate internship geared to the individual student’s interests and abilities with the mentor. The student works approximately 120 hours per semester, with times arranged by the student and employer. Meetings with a faculty mentor, a journal, and periodic papers are required. Pre requisites: FM 10, FM 12, and FM 14 and permission of the Program Director is required.
Credits: 3
On Demand


FM 88 Fashion Merchandising Engaged Learning
This course is designed for any type of engaged learning on campus relatied to the fashion industry, such as working at the Student Body Boutique (one of LIU's Student Run Businesses). Global learning experiences organized by the department may also satisfy the requirements of this course. For example, the Fashion Merchandising week-long study abroad trip to a fashion capital may fulfill the course requirement with approval. Students will participate in engaged learning activities and work with a designated faculty mentor on appropriate deliverables to earn credit for the course. This is a one-credit course that can be repeated up to three times for a total of up to three credits upon approval of the Director.
Credits: 1
On Demand


FM 92 Capstone

The Capstone Project integrates experience, knowledge and skills acquired and developed during the course of study. This project reflects the many ways fashion merchandisers connect with business, media, and communication professionals within the fashion, textile and luxury sectors. Over the course of the semester, students will develop a Fashion Start-up Entrepreneurial Venture by analyzing their target market and competition that culminates in a comprehensive business plan. Students will learn how to craft a mission statement, company name, product description, SWOT analysis, samples, merchandising plan, timeline, marketing strategy, and pitch. The final work can be used to demonstrate to future employers and other interested parties the students' skills and aptitude for similar independent external work assignments. A written and oral presentation will be required.
Credits: 3
Every Spring


MAN 11 Principles of Management

This is the core-marketing course for the LIU Undergraduate Program and it also appeals to non-business-majors who are interested in marketing. The aim of the course is to provide a rigorous and comprehensive introduction to contemporary marketing practice. The participants learn how to analyze complex business situations, identify underlying problems and decide on courses of actions with the help of the modern marketing management techniques. The students learn the concepts and terminology of modern marketing management during lectures, cases and class discussions. Application of the marketing management concepts becomes the focus for the term project.
Credits: 3
Every Semester



MKT 11 Marketing Principles and Practices 

This writing across-the-curriculum course is an analysis of corporate policy with respect to internal financial control, capital budgeting, dividend policy, and the issuance and sale of new securities. Emphasis will be placed on corporate decision-making under uncertainty in areas of investment and financing alternatives, both domestically and internationally. Tools and techniques for risk assessment and risk management will be explored using financial calculators and spreadsheet models. Prerequisites of FIN 11 and ACC 11 are required.
Credits: 3
Every Semester


Post 101 and FY  First-Year Seminar

Provide an emphasis upon the intellectual transition to college, first-year seminars focus on oral communication and critical reading skills taught in the context of theme-oriented academic courses specifically designed to meet the needs of first-year students. The content of these courses varies by discipline, but each course is limited to twenty students and linked in a learning community with a section of Post 101. First-Year Seminars involve intensive faculty mentoring and provide a source of support and insight to students who are encountering the new responsibilities connected to college life. First-Year Seminars can also be used to fulfill major requirements or can be used as electives, including, in many cases, liberal arts electives. Post 101 is best understood a one-credit course preparing first-year students for the challenges of college life. It emphasizes engagement with the campus community as a preparation for engagement with the world as an active, informed citizen. Weekly hour-long class meetings emphasize a holistic approach to learning and introduce students to the behavior, foundational skills, and intellectual aptitudes necessary for success.
Credits: 4
Every Semester




ENG 1 Writing I: composition and Analysis 11  

English 1 is an introductory writing course that uses interpretation and analysis of texts to promote clear thinking and effective prose. Students learn the conventions of academic writing. In addition, students learn how to adapt writing for various audiences and rhetorical situations. This course is required Writing I, an introduction to composition, teaches an understanding of writing in various disciplines through the interpretation and analysis of texts. Students will learn conventions of academic writing. Additionally, students will learn how to adapt in response to different rhetorical situations, genres, purposes, audiences, and other issues of context. Writing I is a course that provides the foundation for understanding how to make meaning from texts. This course is required of all students unless exempted by Advanced Placement credit or successful achievement on the SAT examination in writing. Students exempted by assessment or department proficiency examination must take an upper-level English course in substitution after completing ENG 2. Special sections are offered for students in the Program for Academic Success (P sections), for non-native speakers (F sections), and for students identified as needing more personalized attention (S sections). No Pass/Fail option

Credits: 3
Every Fall, Spring and Summer


 FM 10 Introducti


LAW 13 Legal Environment of Business

This course examines the origins of law, business ethics, court system, business related torts, contracts, agency, partnership, corporations, employment law, intellectual property, and international business law.

Credits: 3
Every Semester


MAN 11 Principles of